Saints Peter & Paul Orthodox Church

109 Grand Street, Jersey City, NJ 07302

5th Saturday of Great Lent: of the Akathist to the Theotokos

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5th Saturday of Great Lent: of the Akathist to the Theotokos
Commemorated on March 28

On the Fifth Saturday of Great Lent, the Saturday of the Akathist, we commemorate the “Laudation of the Virgin” Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos.

In 625, when the emperor Heraclius was fighting the Persians, the Khan sent forces to attack Constantinople by land and by sea. Patriarch Sergius urged the people not to lose heart, but to trust in God.

A procession was made around the city with the Cross of the Lord, the robe of the Virgin, the Icon of the Savior not made by hands, and the Hodigitria Icon of the Mother of God. The Patriarch dipped the Virgin’s robe in the sea, and the city’s defenders beat back the Khan’s sea forces. The sea became very rough, and many boats sank. The invaders retreated, and the people of Constantinople gave thanks to God and to His Most Pure Mother.

On two other occasions, in 655 and 705, the Theotokos protected the city from Saracen invaders. A feastday dedicated to the Laudation of the Virgin was established to commemorate these victories. The Akathist to the Mother of God is believed to originate from this period, and its use has spread from Constantinople to other Orthodox lands.

The icon before which the Akathist was sung was given to the Dionysiou Monastery on Mt. Athos by Emperor Alexius Comnenos. There, it began to flow with myrrh. There were at least three wonderworking copies of this icon in Russia before the Revolution.

This icon shows the Mother of God seated on a throne, and surrounded by Prophets with scrolls.

Uncovering of the Precious Cross

  • 6th Friday Panakhida 6:30 PM
  • 7th Divine Liturgy 9:30 AM

 

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The Holy Empress Helen uncovered the Precious Cross and Nails of the Lord at Jerusalem in 326.

At the beginning of the reign of St Constantine the Great (306-337), the first Roman emperor to recognize Christianity, he and his pious mother St Helen decided to rebuild the city of Jerusalem. They also planned to build a church on the site of the Lord’s suffering and Resurrection, in order to reconsecrate and purify the places connected with the Savior’s death and Resurrection from the foul taint of paganism.

The empress Helen journeyed to Jerusalem with a large quantity of gold. St Constantine wrote a letter to Patriarch Macarius I (313-323), requesting him to assist her in every possible way with her task of the restoring the Christian holy places.

After her arrival in Jerusalem, the holy empress Helen began to destroy all the pagan temples and reconsecrate the places which had been defiled by the pagans.

In her quest for the Life-Creating Cross, she questioned several Christians and Jews, but for a long time her search remained unsuccessful. Finally, an elderly Hebrew named Jude told her that the Cross was buried beneath the temple of Venus. St Helen ordered that the pagan temple be demolished, and for the site to be excavated. Soon they found Golgotha and the Lord’s Sepulchre. Not far from the spot were three crosses, a board with the inscription written by Pilate (John 19:19), and four nails which had pierced the Lord’s Body.

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Pure Week

  • 23 Monday 6:30 PM Great Compline and Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

  • 24 Tuesday 6:30 PM Great Compline and Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

  • 25 Wednesday  6:30 PM Great Compline and Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

  • 26 Thursday 6:30 PM Great Compline and Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

  • 27 Friday 6:30 PM Liturgy Presanctified Gifts – Blessing of Wheat and Honey

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Beginning of Great Lent
Commemorated on February 23
In the Orthodox Church, the last Sunday before Great Lent—the day on which, at Vespers, Lent is liturgically announced and inaugurated—is called Forgiveness Sunday. On the morning of that Sunday, at the Divine Liturgy, we hear the words of Christ:

“If you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses…” (Mark 6:14-15).

Then after Vespers—after hearing the announcement of Lent in the Great Prokeimenon: “Turn not away Thy face from Thy child, for I am afflicted! Hear me speedily! Draw near unto my soul and deliver it!”, after making our entrance into Lenten worship, with its special melodies, with the prayer of St Ephraim the Syrian, with its prostrations—we ask forgiveness from each other, we perform the rite of forgiveness and reconciliation. And as we approach each other with words of reconciliation, the choir intones the Paschal hymns, filling the church with the anticipation of Paschal joy.

What is the meaning of this rite? Why is it that the Church wants us to begin the Lenten season with forgiveness and reconciliation? These questions are in order because for too many people Lent means primarily, and almost exclusively, a change of diet, the compliance with ecclesiastical regulations concerning fasting. They understand fasting as an end in itself, as a “good deed” required by God and carrying in itself its merit and its reward. But the Church spares no effort in revealing to us that fasting is but a means, one among many, towards a higher goal: the spiritual renewal of man, his return to God, true repentance and, therefore, true reconciliation. The Church spares no effort in warning us against a hypocritical and pharisaic fasting, against the reduction of religion to mere external obligations. As a Lenten hymn says:

“In vain do you rejoice in not eating, O soul!
For you abstain from food,
But from passions you are not purified.
If you persevere in sin, you will perform a useless fast!”

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Welcome!

Welcome to Saints Peter and Paul Orthodox Church in Jersey City, New Jersey, We are Orthodox community serving Northeastern New Jersey in the Diocese of New York and New Jersey of the Orthodox Church in America (OCA). We warmly welcome all who are searching for a church that is in unchanging continuity with the Church of the Apostles and where they may find the purity of the Apostolic Faith.

Father Joseph Lickwar 201.434.1986 and (FAX) 201.434.1210
Email ‘josephlickwar@gmail.com’
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Upcoming services

Events on April 4, 2015
Vespers 6 pm & Confessions
Starts: 6:00 pm
Ends: April 4, 2015 - 7:00 pm
Location: 109 Grand Street Jersey City NJ 07302 USA
Description: Orthodox Vespers
Events on April 5, 2015
Entrance into Jersusaslem
Starts: 12:00 am
Ends: April 6, 2015 - 12:00 am
Events on April 5, 2015
Divine Liturgy
Starts: 9:30 am
Ends: April 5, 2015 - 11:00 am
Location: 109 Grand Stteet Jersey City NJ USA
Description: Sunday Orthodox Liturgy